cExams.net
Ordering of Sentences
Directions:In the following items each passage consists of six sentences. The first and the sixth sentence are given in the beginning. The middle four sentences in each have been removed and jumbled up. These are labelled P, Q R and S. You are required to find out the proper sequence of the four sentences.


1. S1: The fifty seven storey Wool-worth Tbwer is in New York.
S6: A new champion is the Empire State Building which rises 102 storeys into the sky.

P: Soon it became one of the famous buildings in the world.
Q: It was completed in 1912.
R: Americans took pride in this tall skyscraper.
S: However, it was not long before five other buildings topped the Woolworth Tower.


2. S1: Trucks, trains, planesand refrigerator ships are new ways of carrying food.
S6: And in a lonely bay, a fisherman still rows home with the day's catch.

P: In many countries, women carry food to market on their heads.
Q: High in the Andes Mountains long lines of Illamas, each with a heavy bag of grain, pick their way along rocky trails.
R: But a great deal of food is still carried on the heads of women and the backs of animals.
S: Over the desert sands, camels carry loads of salt, dates and cheese from one oasis to another.


3. S1: The right way to get people do things the way you want is not to compel them, drive them or for that matter even beg them or entreat them.
S6: The secret ofmotivation, therefore, lies in your ability to arouse the right kind of want or thirst in the other people.

P: The sure way to antagonise an individual is to give him the impression that you are out to force or compel him t;o do something.
Q: The correct way is, therefore, to arouse a want in them and make them do, whatever you want them to do willingly, happily and eagerly.
R: It is the most difficult thing in the world to make an individual do anything against his will.
S: Even young, innocent children resent being made to do things.


4. S1: I never took payment for speaking.
S6: In this way I secured perfect freedom of speech, and was warmed against the accusation of being a professional agitator.

P: The Sunday Society would then assure me that on these terms I might lecture on anything I liked and how I liked.
Q: It often happened that provincial' Sunday societies offered me the usual ten genuine fee to give the usual sort of leacture, avoiding controversial politics and religion.
R: Occasionally to avoid embarrassing other lecturers who lived by lecturing, the account was settled by a debit and credit entry, that is, I was credited with the usual fee and expenses and gave it back as a donation to the society.
S: I always replied that I never lectured on anything but very controversial politics and religion and that my fee was the price of my railway ticket third class if the place was farther off than I could afford to go at my own expense.


5. S1: There were no finger prints anywhere.
S6: These conclusions made the detectives think that it was a fake theft.

P: First of all it was impossible even for a child to enter through the hole in the roof.
Q: When the investigators tried to reconstruct the crime, they came up against facts.
R: Moreover, when the detectives tried to push a silver vase, it was found to be. double the size of the hole.
S: Again, the size of the hole was examined by the experts who said that nothing had been passed through it.



6. S1: We talk about democracy, but when it comes to any particular thing, we prefer a man belonging to our caste and community.
S6: Favouritism and nepotism have been responsible for much discontent in our country.

P: We must be in a position to respect a man as a man.
Q: It means our democracy is a phoney kind of democracy.
R: We must extend opportunities of development to those who deserve them.
S: Our weakness for our own caste and community should not influence our decision.


7. S1: The tooth had abscessed and was causing considerable pain.
S6: It has not returned to this day.

P: Finally, in desperation, she went inside a wooden pyramid model and sat down praying for miracles.
Q: Since it was Sunday morning, no dentist was available.
R: What happened she is not sure, but after fen minutes the pain simply faded away.
S: Common pain killers had been of no avail.


8. S1: Work with retarded children, in particular, involves superhuman patience and long-delayed rewards.
S6: After five years, the girl finally began to smile, when her foster grandparents entered the room.

P: Another woman faithfully spent two hours a day, five days a week, with a bed-ridden retarded girl.
Q: It was three years before the, girl made her first cut in a piece of paper.
R: The girl had never before responded to, or recognised anyone.
S: One woman decided to teach a young brain - damaged girl how to use scissors.


9. S1: It was early 1943 and the war in the East was going disastrously.
S6: Boarding Party, James Leasor's latest best - seller is a record of this tale of heroics tinged with irony and humour.

P: How this unlikely bunch of middle aged civilians accomplished their missions makes fascinating reading.
Q: To stop the sinkings a spy ring had to be broken, a German ship assaulted, and a secret radio transmitter silenced.
R: U-boats were torpedoing Allied ships in the Indian ocean faster ~han they could be replaced.
S: And the only people who could do the job were a handful of British businessmen in Calcutta-all men not called out for active service.


10. S1: It is true that we cannot bring about social equality by law and that therefore there are still inequalities in Indian society.
S6: The secular state as found in India, recognises the importance of religion to the individual by giving hi ' in freedom to practice it and tell others about it, within the limits of the Constitution.

P: In the United States of America, for instance, Negroes have equal rights under the Constitution but unfortunately these rights are not always given to them freely by the White majority.
Q: It takes time for people to change their way of thinking.
R: This is a problem common to many countries.
S: It is only when we realise that social equality means not only that men are equal before the law, but also equal in the eyes of God that we can begin to have a completely casteless society.


Competitive Exams

1. Sentence Completion - Test-06
2. Sentence Completion - Test-05
3. Sentence Completion - Test-04
4. Sentence Completion - Test-03
5. Sentence Completion - Test-02
6. Sentence Completion - Test-01
7. Ordering of Sentences - Test-06
8. Ordering of Sentences - Test-05
9. Ordering of Sentences - Test-04
10. Ordering of Sentences - Test-03
11. Ordering of Sentences - Test-02
12. Ordering of Sentences - Test-01
13. Ordering of Words in a Sentence - Test-05
14. Ordering of Words in a Sentence - Test-04
15. Ordering of Words in a Sentence - Test-03
16. Ordering of Words in a Sentence - Test-02
17. Ordering of Words in a Sentence - Test-01
  • Benefits of Black Pepper
  • Cure for Heart Disease
  • Cologne
  • Benefits of Nectarine
  • Best Valentines Day Gifts
  • Benefits of Grapes

  • Famous Nurses Who Made History

    Mary Todd Lincoln

    The Presidents Wife (1818 to 1882) Mary Anne Todd Lincoln, Former President Abraham Lincolns wife, was better known as a well educated aristocrat with great interest in politics, which actually helped Abraham to the presidential office. Her witty, sarcastic comments, frenzy spending, and alleged mental illness tore into her rather worthy life as wife of a president. At one point of her life as first lady of the United States of America, Mary Todd Lincoln showed the compassionate side of her by working as volunteer nurse in the Union hospitals. On April 1861, the Union soldiers decamped at the White House for support of Lincolns administration, and Mary played a major role of keeping the morale of the soldiers, frequently visiting the wounded soldiers and making rounds to check on their condition. Sadly, though, that person was less noted by the society.


    Chourishi Systems