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complin

n.
1.last of the seven canonical hours just before retiring

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  • Idiom of the Day

    put on clothes
    to get into and wear a piece of clothing
    I put on my sweater before I went outside.



    1.
    Whatever work (a) / that which you undertake (b) / put your best efforts (c) / in it. (d) / No error (e)

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  • Rules to play Hang Gliding

    Thermals

    The most commonly used source of lift is created by the suns energy heating the ground which in turn heats the air above it. This warm air rises in columns known as thermals. Soaring pilots quickly become aware of land features which can generate thermals and their trigger points downwind, because thermals have a surface tension with the ground and roll until hitting a trigger point. When the thermal lifts, the first indicator are the swooping birds feeding on the insects being carried aloft, or dust devils or a change in wind direction as the air is pulled in below the thermal. As the thermal climbs, bigger soaring birds indicate the thermal. The thermal rises until it either forms into a cumulus cloud or hits an inversion layer, which is where the surrounding air is becoming warmer with height, and stops the thermal developing into a cloud. Also, nearly every glider contains an instrument known as a variometer (a very sensitive vertical speed indicator) which shows visually (and often audibly) the presence of lift and sink. Having located a thermal, a glider pilot will circle within the area of rising air to gain height. In the case of a cloud street, thermals can line up with the wind, creating rows of thermals and sinking air. A pilot can use a cloud street to fly long straight line distances by remaining in the row of rising air.


    Chourishi Systems