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compound subjects part one

A subject is the doer of the action in a sentence. A compound subject has
more than one subject.

In each of these sentences, the compound subjects are underlined.

The catand the mouse ran around the room.
Neither the cat nor the mouse heard him.
Both the youngsters and the adults enjoyed square dancing.
Here are two important rules when working with compound subjects. You
will be introduced to several other rules on another page.

➲ Rule #1: Singular subjects joined by and usually agree in number with a
plural verb.

This plant and a large tree were in the photo.
The older boy and his companion have the boxes of fruit.
His dad and my brother are on the same work crew.

➲ Rule #2: Compound subjects that have a single entity agree in number
with a singular verb.

Bacon, lettuce, and tomato is Mitt’s tastiest sandwich. (Bacon, lettuce,
and tomato are a single entity here.)

Chutes and Ladders was Ricky’s favorite game. (Chutes and Ladders is a
game—a single entity.)

All the King’s Men by Robert Penn Warren is a good book to read if
you are interested in politics. (Though the book’s title features a
plural noun, men, the title is considered a single entity. Thus, the
verb is should be used.)

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  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
  • Commas Part Five
  • Commas Part Four
  • Commas Part One
  • Commas Part Three
  • Commas Part Two
  • complete and simple predicates
  • complete and simple subjects
  • complex sentences
  • compound complex sentences
  • compound prepositions and the preposition adverb question
  • compound subject and compound predicate
  • compound subjects part two
  • compound subjects part one
  • Confusing usage words part eight
  • Confusing usage words part five
  • Confusing usage words part four
  • Confusing usage words part one
  • Confusing usage words part seven
  • Confusing usage words part six
  • Confusing usage words part three
  • Confusing usage words part three 2
  • Confusing usage words part two
  • First Capitalization List
  • indefinite pronouns
  • Indefinite pronouns and the possessive case
  • introducing clauses
  • introducing phrases
  • Irregular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • irregular verbs part one
  • irregular verbs part two
  • Italics Hyphens and Brackets
  • Misplaced and dangling modifiers
  • More Apostrophe Situations
  • More subject verb agreement situations
  • Parentheses Ellipsis Marks and Dashes
  • Periods Question Marks and Exclamation Marks
  • personal pronouns
  • pronouns and their antecedents
  • Quotation Marks Part Three
  • Quotation Marks Part One
  • Quotation Marks Part Two
  • reflexive demonstrative and interrogative pronouns
  • Regular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • regular verb tenses
  • Second Capitalization List
  • sentences fragments and run on sentences
  • singular and plural nouns and pronouns
  • Sound a like words Part Four
  • Sound a like words Part Three
  • Sound a like words Part Two
  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
  • the adjective
  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
  • the adverb
  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
  • The Apostrophe
  • the appositive
  • The Colon
  • The coordinating conjunction
  • the correlative conjunction
  • the direct object
  • the gerund and gerund phrase
  • the indirect object
  • the infinitive and infinitive phrase
  • The nominative case
  • the noun
  • the noun adjective pronoun question
  • the noun clause
  • the object of the preposition
  • the participle and participial phrase
  • The possessive case
  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
  • the preposition
  • the prepositional phrase
  • the pronoun
  • The Semicolon
  • the subordinating conjunction
  • the verb
  • The verb be
  • the verb phrase
  • Transitive and intransitive verbs
  • types of nouns
  • types of sentences by purpose
  • Using Capital Letters
  • what good writers do
  • Tips to get ready for Foreign Trip
  • New Year Wishes
  • Rules to play Mountaineering
  • Terrifying Demons That Wont Let You Sleep At Night
  • Surprising Health Benefits Of Tea
  • Romantic Valentines Day Ideas

  • Rules to play Horseshoes

    Tournament play

    Section A
    The standard method of NHPA sanctioned tournament play is round robin play with contestants being seeded into classes. Each contestant will play every contestant in the class.
    Section B
    At the end of round robin play, class winners shall be determined by win loss records or ringer percentage. In addition, total points may be used if the scoring was done using the count all method. If ties occur, they shall be settled by playoff, who beat whom or one of the other methods that was not used to determine the winner. The tournament committee shall decide how winners are to be determined and how ties are to be broken and announce these procedures before tournament play begins. If playoff games take place, the method of play and the length of the games shall be decided by the tournament committee.
    Section C
    A contestants ringer percentage shall be determined by dividing the total number of ringers by the total number of shoes pitched. Shoes pitched in playoff games and in extra innings pitched because of tie games shall be included in these totals.
    Section D
    The rules used to seed contestants in all NHPA sanctioned tournaments are found in Articles X XII of the NHPA Bylaws. In addition, rules regarding game length and format and tie breaking situations in State, Regional,National, and World Championship play are found in the same Articles. The NHPA Dress Code for World Tournament play is found in Article X. Its use is encouraged, but not required, for all NHPA sanctioned play.Section E Handicapping Handicapping may be used in open tournaments and league play. The amount of the handicap shall be determined by the tournament committee. Game handicapping shall not be used in any World, National, or Regional Tournament or in the championship class of a designated division of any State Championship Tournament.


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