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subject and verb agreement

A sentence’s subject must agree in number with its verb. Thus, singular
verbs should be used for singular subjects, and plural verbs should be used
for plural subjects.
➲ In each of these sentences, the singular subject is underlined, and the
singular verb is italicized.
Sam holds the school record for the mile run.
This woman knows that subject very well.
Kara performs with the local dance company.
➲ In each of these sentences, the plural subject is underlined, and the
plural verb is italicized.
These two seniors hold the record for the mile run.
These women know that subject very well.
They perform with the local dance company.
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  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
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  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
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  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
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  • What to Eat in Gujarat

    Panipuri

    The Panipuri is a popular street snack in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Nepal. It consists of a round, hollow puri, fried crisp and filled with a mixture of flavored water (pani), tamarind chutney, chili, chaat masala, potato, onion and chickpeas. It is generally small enough to fit completely into one s mouth. It is a popular street food dish in Mumbai, Kolkata, Delhi, Lucknow, Karachi, Lahore, Chittagong, Dhaka and Kathmandu. In North India it is known as Gol Gappa. The name gol gappa refers to the crisp sphere (gol) that is placed in the mouth and eaten (gappa) one at a time. Pani comes from the Hindi word for water and puri (or poori) is the name of an Indian bread made by deep frying in oil. Dogras, Kashmiris, Bhaderwahis, Gujjars, Paharis, Ladakhis, Himachalis of North India called it Gol Gappa . It is known as bataasha in the Western region of Uttar Pradesh. Bataasha is something which gets smashed with application of a slight pressure; the bataasha gets smashed as soon as it is placed inside the mouth. It is known as Phuchka in Eastern Indian states like Bihar, Jharkhand and West Bengal, also in Bangladesh. Because of the bursting sound in the mouth when it is eaten, called gup chup in Odisha,Hyderabad and South Jharkhand. Gol-Gappa or Pani Pataase in Madhya Pradesh, Gup-Chup or Gol-Gappa or Panipuri in Chhattisgarh. In several parts of Gujarat and Kutch. It is commonly known as pakodi, not to be confused with pakoda.


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