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the direct object

A direct object is a noun or pronoun that receives the action of a transitive
verb (a verb that has an object) or shows the result of that action. A direct
object answers the question ‘‘What?’’ or ‘‘Whom?’’ after the transitive verb.
In these sentences, the transitive verb is underlined, and the direct object
is italicized.

My neighbor asked us an interesting question. (What?)
The television set required repair. (What?)
Tyler edited three errors in her essay. (What?)
They oiledthe skates before lacing them up. (What?)
We guided him during the mountain climb. (Whom?)
James met Mr. Hunt in the school’s main office. (Whom?)

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  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
  • Commas Part Five
  • Commas Part Four
  • Commas Part One
  • Commas Part Three
  • Commas Part Two
  • complete and simple predicates
  • complete and simple subjects
  • complex sentences
  • compound complex sentences
  • compound prepositions and the preposition adverb question
  • compound subject and compound predicate
  • compound subjects part two
  • compound subjects part one
  • Confusing usage words part eight
  • Confusing usage words part five
  • Confusing usage words part four
  • Confusing usage words part one
  • Confusing usage words part seven
  • Confusing usage words part six
  • Confusing usage words part three
  • Confusing usage words part three 2
  • Confusing usage words part two
  • First Capitalization List
  • indefinite pronouns
  • Indefinite pronouns and the possessive case
  • introducing clauses
  • introducing phrases
  • Irregular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • irregular verbs part one
  • irregular verbs part two
  • Italics Hyphens and Brackets
  • Misplaced and dangling modifiers
  • More Apostrophe Situations
  • More subject verb agreement situations
  • Parentheses Ellipsis Marks and Dashes
  • Periods Question Marks and Exclamation Marks
  • personal pronouns
  • pronouns and their antecedents
  • Quotation Marks Part Three
  • Quotation Marks Part One
  • Quotation Marks Part Two
  • reflexive demonstrative and interrogative pronouns
  • Regular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • regular verb tenses
  • Second Capitalization List
  • sentences fragments and run on sentences
  • singular and plural nouns and pronouns
  • Sound a like words Part Four
  • Sound a like words Part Three
  • Sound a like words Part Two
  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
  • the adjective
  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
  • the adverb
  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
  • The Apostrophe
  • the appositive
  • The Colon
  • The coordinating conjunction
  • the correlative conjunction
  • the direct object
  • the gerund and gerund phrase
  • the indirect object
  • the infinitive and infinitive phrase
  • The nominative case
  • the noun
  • the noun adjective pronoun question
  • the noun clause
  • the object of the preposition
  • the participle and participial phrase
  • The possessive case
  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
  • the preposition
  • the prepositional phrase
  • the pronoun
  • The Semicolon
  • the subordinating conjunction
  • the verb
  • The verb be
  • the verb phrase
  • Transitive and intransitive verbs
  • types of nouns
  • types of sentences by purpose
  • Using Capital Letters
  • what good writers do
  • Top Sports Rivalries of All Time
  • Saffron Or Kesar Get Beautiful Skin
  • Amazing Things to do New Years
  • Finishing Moves In WWE
  • Most Beautiful Flowers on Earth
  • Great ways to eat Corn

  • SuperFood

    Green Tea and White Tea

    Green tea is light in color because of incomplete fermentation of the leaf. White tea is tea whose leaves are picked before they open fully, when the buds are still covered with fine, white hairs. That, of course, is why it’s called “white” tea. Green tea and white tea come from the same plant, the tea plant Camellia sinensis. The main difference between the two types of tea is that the white tea leaves are harvested at a younger age than the green tea leaves. They both undergo very little processing, though white tea is the least processed of any tea. Green tea is only partly fermented, and white tea is not fermented at all. By contrast, black tea is fully fermented.
    Because they are so gently treated, green tea and white tea retain higher amounts of their beneficial antioxidants.
    Studies have shown that white tea has a concentration of antioxidants that is three times higher than that of green tea. White tea contains less caffeine than green tea, about 15 milligrams per serving compared to 20 milligrams per serving for green tea. If caffeine tends to make you jittery, white tea may be the better choice.
    White tea has the highest antioxidant content of any tea, which for many is the main reason for drinking it. As a comparison, one cup of white tea contains approximately twelve times as many antioxidants as fresh orange juice. Active ingredients of green tea and white tea, including catechin, theanine, and saponin, work to scavenge active oxygen species in the blood, helping protect the body from harmful microorganisms.
    Nutritional Facts :
    One fusion green and white tea bag provides 0 calories, 0 g carbohydrate, 0 g protein, 0 g fat, and 0 g dietary fiber.


    Chourishi Systems