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subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives

A subject complement is a word or group of words within the complete
predicate that either identifies (with a predicate nominative) or describes (with
a predicate adjective) the subject (doer of the action). There are two types of
subject complements—the predicate adjective (the describer) and the predicate
nominative (the identifier).

As an example, in the sentence, ‘‘Our Town is a play written by Thornton
Wilder,’’ the complete predicate, is a play written by Thornton Wilder, includes
play (predicate nominative), the word that identifies what Our Town is. In
the sentence, ‘‘The play was interesting and inspirational,’’ the complete
predicate, was interesting and inspirational, includes the words interesting and
inspirational (two predicate adjectives) to describe what the play was.

The subject complement is underlined in these sentences.

O’Hare is a very busy airport. (predicate nominative)
Mike Smith is a terrific friend. (predicate nominative)
Indiana’s capital city is Indianapolis. (predicate nominative)
She was the first president of that association. (predicate nominative)
Mitchell’s report was factually correct. (predicate adjective)
The lake’s water was crystal clear. (predicate adjective)
Gary’s parents and grandparents are quite successful in the business world.
(predicate adjective)
The basement was moldy, dusty, and unpainted. (predicate adjectives)

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  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
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  • Hanuman

    AN EVENT FROM MAHABHARAT

    Since Hanumanji is one of the Chiranjeevis (immortals), he has a boon to live forever. This story date back to Mahabharat days. During the Vanvas (exile) period of Pandvas, a pleasant flower breeze flew in the direction where Draupadi ( queen of the pandavs) was resting. She loved the smell and asked Bhim ( A Pandav) to get her a Lotus flower. Bhim and Hanuman
    Bhim answered, Oh! its nothing. I will bring you in a second. He searched the forest for that fragrance and as he was about to reach there he found a monkey sleeping on the road.
    Bhim did not recognize him and said, Oh, you old monkey, move away from the road. I am on a task and you are delaying it. I am a strong warrior.
    Hanuman replied politely, Move my tail off the road first and then I will move away. Bhim the strongest of the Pandavas smirked and tried to lift Hanumans tail with one hand but to his surprise it felt as if it was stuck to the ground. He applied his full force but was not able to lift Hanumans tail. He realized that this was not an ordinary monkey whom he was messing with.
    He prays to him to reveal his true identity and Hanuman reveals his real avatar.Bhim ask for forgiveness and this is how Bhim met Hanuman during Mahabharat times.


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