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types of nouns

A noun is the name of a person, place, thing, or idea. There are singular nouns
that name ONE person (player), place (room), thing (towel), or idea (love), and
there are plural nouns that are the names for MORE THAN ONE person (play-
ers), place (rooms), thing (towels), or idea (loves).

There are other types of nouns that are good to know. They include the
following.

Common nouns begin with a lowercase (or small) letter since they
name any person, place, thing, or idea. They are nonspecific. Some sin-
gular common nouns include actor (person), lounge (place), stick (thing),
and kindness (idea). Plural common nouns include men (persons), head-
quarters (places), computers (things), and liberties (ideas).

Proper nouns begin with an uppercase (or capital) letter because they
name specific persons, places, things, and ideas. Proper nouns include
President Harry Truman (person), Eiffel Tower (place), American Federation
of Teachers (thing), and Theory of Relativity (idea).

Concrete nouns name a person, place, thing, or idea that can be perceived
by one or more of your senses (seeing, hearing, touching, tasting,
and smelling). Popcorn, thunder, rainfall, skunk, windmill, and hair are
concrete nouns.

Abstract nouns name an idea, feeling, quality, or trait. Examples
of abstract nouns include pity, weakness, humility, and elation.

Collective nouns name a group of people or things. Some collective
nouns are squad, assembly, team, jury, flock, and herd.

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  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
  • Commas Part Five
  • Commas Part Four
  • Commas Part One
  • Commas Part Three
  • Commas Part Two
  • complete and simple predicates
  • complete and simple subjects
  • complex sentences
  • compound complex sentences
  • compound prepositions and the preposition adverb question
  • compound subject and compound predicate
  • compound subjects part two
  • compound subjects part one
  • Confusing usage words part eight
  • Confusing usage words part five
  • Confusing usage words part four
  • Confusing usage words part one
  • Confusing usage words part seven
  • Confusing usage words part six
  • Confusing usage words part three
  • Confusing usage words part three 2
  • Confusing usage words part two
  • First Capitalization List
  • indefinite pronouns
  • Indefinite pronouns and the possessive case
  • introducing clauses
  • introducing phrases
  • Irregular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • irregular verbs part one
  • irregular verbs part two
  • Italics Hyphens and Brackets
  • Misplaced and dangling modifiers
  • More Apostrophe Situations
  • More subject verb agreement situations
  • Parentheses Ellipsis Marks and Dashes
  • Periods Question Marks and Exclamation Marks
  • personal pronouns
  • pronouns and their antecedents
  • Quotation Marks Part Three
  • Quotation Marks Part One
  • Quotation Marks Part Two
  • reflexive demonstrative and interrogative pronouns
  • Regular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • regular verb tenses
  • Second Capitalization List
  • sentences fragments and run on sentences
  • singular and plural nouns and pronouns
  • Sound a like words Part Four
  • Sound a like words Part Three
  • Sound a like words Part Two
  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
  • the adjective
  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
  • the adverb
  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
  • The Apostrophe
  • the appositive
  • The Colon
  • The coordinating conjunction
  • the correlative conjunction
  • the direct object
  • the gerund and gerund phrase
  • the indirect object
  • the infinitive and infinitive phrase
  • The nominative case
  • the noun
  • the noun adjective pronoun question
  • the noun clause
  • the object of the preposition
  • the participle and participial phrase
  • The possessive case
  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
  • the preposition
  • the prepositional phrase
  • the pronoun
  • The Semicolon
  • the subordinating conjunction
  • the verb
  • The verb be
  • the verb phrase
  • Transitive and intransitive verbs
  • types of nouns
  • types of sentences by purpose
  • Using Capital Letters
  • what good writers do
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  • Rules to play Wheelchair Basketball

    Injury

    In the event of injury to a player(s), the officials may stop the game.If the ball is live when an injury occurs, the official shall not blow his whistle until the team in control of the ball has shot for a field goal, lost control of the ball, withheld the ball from play or the ball has become dead. If it is necessary to protect an injured player, the officials may stop the game immediately.

    If the injured player cannot continue to play immediately (within approximately 15 seconds) or, if he receives treatment, he must be substituted unless the team is reduced to fewer than 5 players on the playing court.Team bench personnel may enter the playing court, only with the permission of an official, to attend to an injured player before he is substituted.

    A doctor may enter the playing court, without the permission of an official if, in the doctors judgement, the injured player requires immediate medical treatment.

    During the game, any player who is bleeding or has an open wound must be substituted. He may return to the playing court only after the bleeding has stopped and the affected area or open wound has been completely and securely covered. If the injured player or any player who is bleeding or has an open wound recovers during a time out taken by either team, before the scorers signal for the substitution, that player may continue to play.

    Players who have been designated by the coach to start the game or who receive treatment between free throws may be substituted in the event of an injury. In this case, the opponents are also entitled to substitute the same number of players, if they so wish.


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