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The nominative case

Nouns and pronouns (I, you, he, she, it, we, and they, to name a few) used in
the nominative case function as subjects and predicate nominatives in
sentences.

Subject examples:
Patsy read the newspaper.
I can assist you with the project.
They will be doing the least favorite part of the job.
Predicate nominative examples:
The new champion is Tony.
The new leader is he.
Their choices for club leaders are you and Juanita.
Note: In all cases, an appositive is in the same case as the word it refers to in
the sentence. Thus, in certain situations, an appositive is in the nominative
case.

We neighbors must rely upon one another. (Because we refers to the
sentenceís subject, neighbors, we is in the nominative case.)
The witnesses are we people. (Because we refers to the sentenceís
predicate nominative, people, we is in the nominative case.)
The proposalís writers, Jess and Tess, were present. (Jess and Tess are
the appositives and are in the nominative case.)

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  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
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  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
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  • Durga Puja

    About Goddess Durga Maa

    Goddess Durga is worshiped especially in West Bengal. According to Hinduism, Goddess Durga is a symbol of female dynamism and Destroyer of demons. Who hold the infinite power of the universe and said to be as mother of the Universe.Goddess Durga, wife of Lord Shiva, is called by many other names, such as Parvati, Ambika and Kali. She has two sons, Ganesha and Karttikeya, and two daughters Lakshmi and Sarashawti. Goddess Durga depicted as having ten arms, riding on a lion, carrying weapons and a lotus flower, maintaining a meditative smile.Navratri 2014 in India Traditionally, Durga Puja is a Hindu festival celebrated during the month of September or October in India. Current year Durga Puja will start on Tuesday, 30th September, 2014 and will continue to Saturday, 4th October, 2014. The festival Durga Puja specially is celebrated in West Bengal surrounding the capital city of Kolkata or in Bengali communities of other states. Dussera or Navaratri is the similar festival of Durgapuja celebrated rest part of India except eastern India.


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