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The possessive case 2

Nouns and pronouns (me, you, her, him, it, them, and us, to name a few) used
in the objective case function as direct objects, indirect objects, and objects
of the preposition.

The direct object is a noun or pronoun that answers the question ‘‘who?’’ or
‘‘what?’’ after an action verb.
➲ You asked me an interesting question. (What did you ask me?—an interesting
question. Thus, question is the direct object.)
➲ The dog drank the water and the lemonade. (What did the dog drink?—
the water and the lemonade. Thus, water and lemonade are the compound
direct objects.)

The indirect object is a noun or pronoun that answers the question ‘‘for
whom?’’ or ‘‘to whom?’’ after an action verb. If a sentence includes an indirect
object, itmust also have a direct object.
➲ George brought his mom some groceries. (Mom is the indirect object,
and groceries is the direct object.)

➲ We gave her and him a new car. (The two pronouns, her and him, answer
the question ‘‘to whom?’’ did we give a new car. Therefore, her and him
are the compound indirect objects, and car is the direct object.)
The object of the preposition is a noun or pronoun that usually ends the
phrase begun by the preposition.

➲ Sherry walked into the cafeteria. (The prepositional phrase, into the cafeteria,
includes the object of the preposition, cafeteria.)

➲ They sat beside her and me. (The prepositional phrase, beside her and me,
includes the compound objects of the preposition, her and me.)

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  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
  • Commas Part Five
  • Commas Part Four
  • Commas Part One
  • Commas Part Three
  • Commas Part Two
  • complete and simple predicates
  • complete and simple subjects
  • complex sentences
  • compound complex sentences
  • compound prepositions and the preposition adverb question
  • compound subject and compound predicate
  • compound subjects part two
  • compound subjects part one
  • Confusing usage words part eight
  • Confusing usage words part five
  • Confusing usage words part four
  • Confusing usage words part one
  • Confusing usage words part seven
  • Confusing usage words part six
  • Confusing usage words part three
  • Confusing usage words part three 2
  • Confusing usage words part two
  • First Capitalization List
  • indefinite pronouns
  • Indefinite pronouns and the possessive case
  • introducing clauses
  • introducing phrases
  • Irregular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • irregular verbs part one
  • irregular verbs part two
  • Italics Hyphens and Brackets
  • Misplaced and dangling modifiers
  • More Apostrophe Situations
  • More subject verb agreement situations
  • Parentheses Ellipsis Marks and Dashes
  • Periods Question Marks and Exclamation Marks
  • personal pronouns
  • pronouns and their antecedents
  • Quotation Marks Part Three
  • Quotation Marks Part One
  • Quotation Marks Part Two
  • reflexive demonstrative and interrogative pronouns
  • Regular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • regular verb tenses
  • Second Capitalization List
  • sentences fragments and run on sentences
  • singular and plural nouns and pronouns
  • Sound a like words Part Four
  • Sound a like words Part Three
  • Sound a like words Part Two
  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
  • the adjective
  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
  • the adverb
  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
  • The Apostrophe
  • the appositive
  • The Colon
  • The coordinating conjunction
  • the correlative conjunction
  • the direct object
  • the gerund and gerund phrase
  • the indirect object
  • the infinitive and infinitive phrase
  • The nominative case
  • the noun
  • the noun adjective pronoun question
  • the noun clause
  • the object of the preposition
  • the participle and participial phrase
  • The possessive case
  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
  • the preposition
  • the prepositional phrase
  • the pronoun
  • The Semicolon
  • the subordinating conjunction
  • the verb
  • The verb be
  • the verb phrase
  • Transitive and intransitive verbs
  • types of nouns
  • types of sentences by purpose
  • Using Capital Letters
  • what good writers do
  • Search Tricks
  • What to Eat in Goa
  • Habits That Will Make You Successful Early In Life
  • Reality TV Shows That Are Far From Reality
  • Myth about Accounting
  • Benefits of Victoria Plum

  • Mango Varieties

    Duncan

    Duncan, of unknown parentage, was one of the few patented varieties of Florida, being bred and protected by David Sturrock of Palm Beach County due to its exceptional production, disease resistance and eating quality. The fruit are oblong and are of uniform shape throughout the canopy, from 16 to 24 oz. The color is a solid canary yellow with no blush. The skin is thick, waxy and resistant to handling damage, with a soft, tender, and juicy orange flesh. The flesh is velvet-smooth and bright yellow, with an exceptionally sweet, slightly tangy, refreshing flavor reminiscent of Carabao, with a hint of citrus and a fruity aroma. The fruit ripen in July in Florida and are tolerant of anthracose infection, making them suitable for production under humid, rainy conditions. Production is heavy. The tree itself is vigorous and open in its growth habit, but highly manageable. It can be maintained at a height and spread of 8 to 10 ft with a minimal of care and pruning.


    Chourishi Systems