sentences fragments and run on sentences

A sentence can be a word (Stop!) or a group of words that must contain a
subject (doer), a verb (action), and a complete thought.

➲ In the sentence, ‘‘Lorina washed her face,’’ the subject is Lorina, the verb
is washed, and the group of words makes a complete thought.
A fragment is a group of words that might lack a subject or a verb and does
notmake a complete thought.

➲ ‘‘During the trial’’ is a fragment since there is no subject, verb, or
complete thought.

➲‘‘Vicki running next to her sister’’ is another fragment because, though
it has a subject, (Vicki), and possibly a verb (running), the group of words
does not make a complete thought. Thus, it is not a sentence.

➲ The group of words ‘‘After these stray dogs were placed in the pound’’ is
also a fragment. It has a subject (dogs) and a verb (were placed), but there
is no complete thought.

A run-on sentence is two (or more) sentences incorrectly written as a single

➲ ‘‘The sofa is comfortable, the chair is too’’ is an example of a run-on
sentence because two complete sentences are incorrectly joined (or
spliced) by a comma.

➲ Sometimes run-on sentences have no punctuation at all! An example
of this is, ‘‘Princeton University is a fine place of higher learning it is
located in New Jersey.’’ Here, there are really two sentences that have
been mistakenly joined or spliced into one.

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  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
  • Commas Part Five
  • Commas Part Four
  • Commas Part One
  • Commas Part Three
  • Commas Part Two
  • complete and simple predicates
  • complete and simple subjects
  • complex sentences
  • compound complex sentences
  • compound prepositions and the preposition adverb question
  • compound subject and compound predicate
  • compound subjects part two
  • compound subjects part one
  • Confusing usage words part eight
  • Confusing usage words part five
  • Confusing usage words part four
  • Confusing usage words part one
  • Confusing usage words part seven
  • Confusing usage words part six
  • Confusing usage words part three
  • Confusing usage words part three 2
  • Confusing usage words part two
  • First Capitalization List
  • indefinite pronouns
  • Indefinite pronouns and the possessive case
  • introducing clauses
  • introducing phrases
  • Irregular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • irregular verbs part one
  • irregular verbs part two
  • Italics Hyphens and Brackets
  • Misplaced and dangling modifiers
  • More Apostrophe Situations
  • More subject verb agreement situations
  • Parentheses Ellipsis Marks and Dashes
  • Periods Question Marks and Exclamation Marks
  • personal pronouns
  • pronouns and their antecedents
  • Quotation Marks Part Three
  • Quotation Marks Part One
  • Quotation Marks Part Two
  • reflexive demonstrative and interrogative pronouns
  • Regular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • regular verb tenses
  • Second Capitalization List
  • sentences fragments and run on sentences
  • singular and plural nouns and pronouns
  • Sound a like words Part Four
  • Sound a like words Part Three
  • Sound a like words Part Two
  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
  • the adjective
  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
  • the adverb
  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
  • The Apostrophe
  • the appositive
  • The Colon
  • The coordinating conjunction
  • the correlative conjunction
  • the direct object
  • the gerund and gerund phrase
  • the indirect object
  • the infinitive and infinitive phrase
  • The nominative case
  • the noun
  • the noun adjective pronoun question
  • the noun clause
  • the object of the preposition
  • the participle and participial phrase
  • The possessive case
  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
  • the preposition
  • the prepositional phrase
  • the pronoun
  • The Semicolon
  • the subordinating conjunction
  • the verb
  • The verb be
  • the verb phrase
  • Transitive and intransitive verbs
  • types of nouns
  • types of sentences by purpose
  • Using Capital Letters
  • what good writers do
  • Class 8 - Social Justice and The Marginalised
  • Sunniest Places in the World
  • Most Prettiest Faces In The World
  • Most Intense Sports of the Ancient World
  • 101 Romantic Ideas
  • Vienna

  • Rules to play Roller Soccer


    Roller derby athletes may attempt to knock their opponents out of bounds or impede their movements by blocking actions which are not solely within the prerogative of the official blockers. Legal blocks follow certain rules. Contact by hands, elbows, head and feet are prohibited, as is contact above the shoulders or below mid thigh. Furthermore, contact may not be from the rear, only from a players front or sides.

    Chourishi Systems