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sentences fragments and run on sentences

A sentence can be a word (Stop!) or a group of words that must contain a
subject (doer), a verb (action), and a complete thought.

➲ In the sentence, ‘‘Lorina washed her face,’’ the subject is Lorina, the verb
is washed, and the group of words makes a complete thought.
A fragment is a group of words that might lack a subject or a verb and does
notmake a complete thought.

➲ ‘‘During the trial’’ is a fragment since there is no subject, verb, or
complete thought.

➲‘‘Vicki running next to her sister’’ is another fragment because, though
it has a subject, (Vicki), and possibly a verb (running), the group of words
does not make a complete thought. Thus, it is not a sentence.

➲ The group of words ‘‘After these stray dogs were placed in the pound’’ is
also a fragment. It has a subject (dogs) and a verb (were placed), but there
is no complete thought.

A run-on sentence is two (or more) sentences incorrectly written as a single
sentence.

➲ ‘‘The sofa is comfortable, the chair is too’’ is an example of a run-on
sentence because two complete sentences are incorrectly joined (or
spliced) by a comma.

➲ Sometimes run-on sentences have no punctuation at all! An example
of this is, ‘‘Princeton University is a fine place of higher learning it is
located in New Jersey.’’ Here, there are really two sentences that have
been mistakenly joined or spliced into one.

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  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
  • Commas Part Five
  • Commas Part Four
  • Commas Part One
  • Commas Part Three
  • Commas Part Two
  • complete and simple predicates
  • complete and simple subjects
  • complex sentences
  • compound complex sentences
  • compound prepositions and the preposition adverb question
  • compound subject and compound predicate
  • compound subjects part two
  • compound subjects part one
  • Confusing usage words part eight
  • Confusing usage words part five
  • Confusing usage words part four
  • Confusing usage words part one
  • Confusing usage words part seven
  • Confusing usage words part six
  • Confusing usage words part three
  • Confusing usage words part three 2
  • Confusing usage words part two
  • First Capitalization List
  • indefinite pronouns
  • Indefinite pronouns and the possessive case
  • introducing clauses
  • introducing phrases
  • Irregular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • irregular verbs part one
  • irregular verbs part two
  • Italics Hyphens and Brackets
  • Misplaced and dangling modifiers
  • More Apostrophe Situations
  • More subject verb agreement situations
  • Parentheses Ellipsis Marks and Dashes
  • Periods Question Marks and Exclamation Marks
  • personal pronouns
  • pronouns and their antecedents
  • Quotation Marks Part Three
  • Quotation Marks Part One
  • Quotation Marks Part Two
  • reflexive demonstrative and interrogative pronouns
  • Regular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • regular verb tenses
  • Second Capitalization List
  • sentences fragments and run on sentences
  • singular and plural nouns and pronouns
  • Sound a like words Part Four
  • Sound a like words Part Three
  • Sound a like words Part Two
  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
  • the adjective
  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
  • the adverb
  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
  • The Apostrophe
  • the appositive
  • The Colon
  • The coordinating conjunction
  • the correlative conjunction
  • the direct object
  • the gerund and gerund phrase
  • the indirect object
  • the infinitive and infinitive phrase
  • The nominative case
  • the noun
  • the noun adjective pronoun question
  • the noun clause
  • the object of the preposition
  • the participle and participial phrase
  • The possessive case
  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
  • the preposition
  • the prepositional phrase
  • the pronoun
  • The Semicolon
  • the subordinating conjunction
  • the verb
  • The verb be
  • the verb phrase
  • Transitive and intransitive verbs
  • types of nouns
  • types of sentences by purpose
  • Using Capital Letters
  • what good writers do
  • Christmas SMS
  • Healthy Smiley Face
  • Tips to get ready for Office
  • Most Dangerous Animal in the World
  • GK Indian Economy
  • Most Creative Beds

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