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The possessive case and pronouns

A word used in the possessive case shows ownership. Possessive pronouns do not require
apostrophes.

The singular possessive pronouns aremy, mine, your, yours, his, her, hers, and its.
The plural possessive pronouns are our, ours, your, yours, their, and theirs.
The possessive pronoun whose also does not require an apostrophe.
This house is theirs.
Their car is currently in the shop.
Your notebook and my textbook are in the school’s cafeteria.
Is that package theirs or ours?
The movie has lost its appeal with her children.
His bike is locked up next to mine in your space.

Note: Though a noun that precedes a gerund (word that ends in -ing and functions as a
noun) requires an apostrophe, the pronoun that does the same does not require one.
Nina’s selecting that prize was very interesting. (Nina’s, a possessive noun/adjective,
requires an apostrophe.)
Her selecting that prize was very interesting. (Her, a possessive pronoun/adjective, does
not require an apostrophe.)

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    Coastal Potholes

    Geology is a branch of science which includes the study of the Earth rocks etc. It gives an insight to the history of the Earth as it provides evidence of plate tectonics features of the Earth in the past past climatic conditions etc.Any of the various coastal features present along any coast as a result of a combination of processes sediments and the geology of the coast itself are known as coastal land-forms. The coastal environment is made up of a wide variety of land-forms established in a variety of sizes and shapes ranging from the slope of the beach the small potholes formed along the shores to the high cliffs. Yet coastal land-forms are characterized into two broad categories: depositional formations and erosional formations. The formation of coastal potholes is an example of erosional formation.


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