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the adverb phrase

A prepositional phrase that answers any of these questions—When? Where?
How? Why? Under what conditions? or To what degree?—is an adverb phrase.
If you can logically move the prepositional phrase within the sentence, it
is probably an adverb phrase. Remember that an adverb phrase contains
no verb.

The adverb phrases in these sentences are underlined.
We walked after dinner. (When?)
The little boys and girls ran into the hallway. (Where?)
Audrey, one of the chaperones, certainly handled herself with class
yesterday. (How?)
John built the wooden shed with much assistance. (Under what
conditions?)
The underdog candidate won the state election by a landslide. (To
what degree?)

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  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
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  • Regular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
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  • Second Capitalization List
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  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
  • the adjective
  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
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  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
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  • Daily Health Tips

    Nature Cure Methodology for Tuberculosis

    Tuberculosis is no longer considered incurable if it is tackled in the early stages. An all round scheme of dietetic and vitality building programme along natural lines is the only method to overcome the disease. As a first step, the patient should be put on an exclusive fresh fruit diet for three or four days. He should have three meals a day of fresh, juicy fruits, such as apples, grapes, pears, peaches, oranges, pineapple, melon or any other juicy fruit in season. Bananas, dried or tinned fruits should not be taken. For drinks, unsweetened lemon water or plain water either hot or cold may be taken. If losing such weight on the all-fruit diet, those already under weight may add a glass of milk to each fruit meal. After the all-fruit diet, the patient should adopt a fruit and milk diet. For this diet, the meals are exactly the same as the all-fruit diet, but with milk added to each fruit meal. The patient may begin with a litre of milk the first day and increase by quarter litre daily up to two to two and a half litres according to how the milk agrees. The milk should be fresh and unboiled, but may be slightly warmed if desired. It should be sipped very slowly. The fruit and milk diet should be continued for four to six weeks. Thereafter, the following dietary may be adopted:
  • Breakfast: Fresh fruits, as obtainable, and milk. Prunes or other dried fruits may also be taken, if desired.
  • Lunch: Steamed vegetables as available, one or two whole wheat chapattis and a glass of
  • buttermilk.
  • Dinner: A bowl of raw salad of suitable vegetables with whole wheat bread and butter. Stewed fruit or cooked apple may be taken for dessert.
  • At bed time: A glass of milk.


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