cExams.net

introducing clauses

A clause is a group of words that has both a subject and a verb. Any simple
sentence is a clause. Unlike phrases, clauses include both a subject and a verb.
The specific types of clauses are the following:
➲ A main or independent clause is a group of words that can stand
alone. ‘‘Jeremiah was a bullfrog’’ is such a clause.

➲ A subordinate or dependent clause is a group of words that
cannot stand alone. This clause needs to be accompanied by a main
or independent clause to make sense. In the sentence, ‘‘Moe went to
the department store after she finished her drawings,’’ the subordinate
or dependent clause is after she finished her drawings, and the main or
independent clause is Moe went to the department store.

The three types of subordinate or dependent clauses are these:

➲ The adverb clause is a group of words that functions as an adverb.
In the sentence, ‘‘While Nick was riding his bike, he saw his friends
walking along the street,’’ the adverb clause is While Nick was riding
his bike.

➲ The adjective clause is a group of words that functions as an adjective.
In the sentence, ‘‘Doris is the woman who designed the mural,’’ the
adjective clause who designed the mural describes the woman.

➲ The noun clause is a group of words that functions as a noun. In the
sentence, ‘‘This is what the doctor recommended to me,’’ the noun
clause is what the doctor recommended to me. The clause functions as a
predicate nominative.

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  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
  • Commas Part Five
  • Commas Part Four
  • Commas Part One
  • Commas Part Three
  • Commas Part Two
  • complete and simple predicates
  • complete and simple subjects
  • complex sentences
  • compound complex sentences
  • compound prepositions and the preposition adverb question
  • compound subject and compound predicate
  • compound subjects part two
  • compound subjects part one
  • Confusing usage words part eight
  • Confusing usage words part five
  • Confusing usage words part four
  • Confusing usage words part one
  • Confusing usage words part seven
  • Confusing usage words part six
  • Confusing usage words part three
  • Confusing usage words part three 2
  • Confusing usage words part two
  • First Capitalization List
  • indefinite pronouns
  • Indefinite pronouns and the possessive case
  • introducing clauses
  • introducing phrases
  • Irregular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • irregular verbs part one
  • irregular verbs part two
  • Italics Hyphens and Brackets
  • Misplaced and dangling modifiers
  • More Apostrophe Situations
  • More subject verb agreement situations
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  • Periods Question Marks and Exclamation Marks
  • personal pronouns
  • pronouns and their antecedents
  • Quotation Marks Part Three
  • Quotation Marks Part One
  • Quotation Marks Part Two
  • reflexive demonstrative and interrogative pronouns
  • Regular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • regular verb tenses
  • Second Capitalization List
  • sentences fragments and run on sentences
  • singular and plural nouns and pronouns
  • Sound a like words Part Four
  • Sound a like words Part Three
  • Sound a like words Part Two
  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
  • the adjective
  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
  • the adverb
  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
  • The Apostrophe
  • the appositive
  • The Colon
  • The coordinating conjunction
  • the correlative conjunction
  • the direct object
  • the gerund and gerund phrase
  • the indirect object
  • the infinitive and infinitive phrase
  • The nominative case
  • the noun
  • the noun adjective pronoun question
  • the noun clause
  • the object of the preposition
  • the participle and participial phrase
  • The possessive case
  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
  • the preposition
  • the prepositional phrase
  • the pronoun
  • The Semicolon
  • the subordinating conjunction
  • the verb
  • The verb be
  • the verb phrase
  • Transitive and intransitive verbs
  • types of nouns
  • types of sentences by purpose
  • Using Capital Letters
  • what good writers do
  • Best Women Trench Coats
  • Benefits of Kale
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  • Snow White
  • Cutest Photos Of Animals Kissing
  • Biggest Man Made Environmental Disasters

  • Rules For Play Xmas Games

    One last thought

    I have heard from other people who host Dirty Santa parties that some folks complain about the first player only having one choice. If the gift that the first player opens is a dud (meaning nobody else wants it), the first player is out of the game before the fun really gets started. But what folks dont seem to realize is that this can happen to any player who opens a wrapped gift and finds that it is a dud. That player is also out of the game as to possible further participation.

    As a result of this pity for the first player, a whole bunch of special rules (swaps at the end of the game, extra gifts added to the pile at the start or end of the game) have been suggested. This gets too complicated, involved and has its own set of problems, misunderstandings, hard feelings and surprises.

    The first person has the pick of the litter of all the gifts. No other player has this advantage. In all the times we have played Dirty Santa at our annual holiday party we have never had the first player feel cheated. Any player could select a dud gift whether they are the first or last player. This is the reason the gifts should be well thought out. They need to have broad appeal to most people and be something worth stealing.


    Chourishi Systems