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Confusing usage words part two

  • anywhere: in, at, or to any place
    I think that we can drive anywhere in this county.
    anywheres: This word does not exist in the English language.
  • as: (conjunction that starts a subordinate clause); (adverb) to the same
    degree, equally. (As is also a preposition.)
    Rex is already as tall as his dad.
    like: (preposition) similar to; resembling in some manner. (Like is also
    an adjective, a verb, and an adverb.)
    He is much like his brother when it comes to helping others.
  • beside: (preposition) by or at the side of; alongside
    Would you be willing to sit beside my sister and me at the graduation
    ceremony?
    besides: (adverb) in addition; as well
    Besides those math problems, what other homework do you have
    tonight?
  • bring: (verb) to move something to a place
    Bring the boxes back to the table.
    take: (verb) to move something away from a place
    Take the boxes to that table.
  • borrow: (verb) to take or receive from another on the provision that it
    will be returned
    May I borrow some money for a few days?
    lend: (verb) to let another use or have
    Could you please lend me a few dollars for the weekend?
  • --- >>>
  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
  • Commas Part Five
  • Commas Part Four
  • Commas Part One
  • Commas Part Three
  • Commas Part Two
  • complete and simple predicates
  • complete and simple subjects
  • complex sentences
  • compound complex sentences
  • compound prepositions and the preposition adverb question
  • compound subject and compound predicate
  • compound subjects part two
  • compound subjects part one
  • Confusing usage words part eight
  • Confusing usage words part five
  • Confusing usage words part four
  • Confusing usage words part one
  • Confusing usage words part seven
  • Confusing usage words part six
  • Confusing usage words part three
  • Confusing usage words part three 2
  • Confusing usage words part two
  • First Capitalization List
  • indefinite pronouns
  • Indefinite pronouns and the possessive case
  • introducing clauses
  • introducing phrases
  • Irregular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • irregular verbs part one
  • irregular verbs part two
  • Italics Hyphens and Brackets
  • Misplaced and dangling modifiers
  • More Apostrophe Situations
  • More subject verb agreement situations
  • Parentheses Ellipsis Marks and Dashes
  • Periods Question Marks and Exclamation Marks
  • personal pronouns
  • pronouns and their antecedents
  • Quotation Marks Part Three
  • Quotation Marks Part One
  • Quotation Marks Part Two
  • reflexive demonstrative and interrogative pronouns
  • Regular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • regular verb tenses
  • Second Capitalization List
  • sentences fragments and run on sentences
  • singular and plural nouns and pronouns
  • Sound a like words Part Four
  • Sound a like words Part Three
  • Sound a like words Part Two
  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
  • the adjective
  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
  • the adverb
  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
  • The Apostrophe
  • the appositive
  • The Colon
  • The coordinating conjunction
  • the correlative conjunction
  • the direct object
  • the gerund and gerund phrase
  • the indirect object
  • the infinitive and infinitive phrase
  • The nominative case
  • the noun
  • the noun adjective pronoun question
  • the noun clause
  • the object of the preposition
  • the participle and participial phrase
  • The possessive case
  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
  • the preposition
  • the prepositional phrase
  • the pronoun
  • The Semicolon
  • the subordinating conjunction
  • the verb
  • The verb be
  • the verb phrase
  • Transitive and intransitive verbs
  • types of nouns
  • types of sentences by purpose
  • Using Capital Letters
  • what good writers do
  • Benefits of Durian
  • Benefits of Cumin
  • Beauty
  • Meaning of Indian Names - Quiz
  • Tips to get ready for Foreign Trip
  • Rare Celebrity Pre Fame Shocking Photos

  • Greatest Leaders in World

    Pope Francis

    Since becoming pope in 2013, Francis (the former Jorge Mario Bergoglio) has been shaking up the management of one of the worlds largest bureaucracies: the Roman Catholic Church. That earned him the top spot on Fortunes list of Worlds Greatest Leaders last year but his vision, fortitude, and commitment to reform were so extraordinary in 2014 that were including him again this year. It is not just that he has led by example by now its well known that the pope, who has long championed the virtues of charity and modesty, has forgone the traditional suite in the Apostolic Palace, opting instead to reside in a one bedroom apartment in the Vatican guesthouse. Less known is how decisive he is in personnel choices, replacing the boards of the Vatican Bank and its main regulatory body with highly respected business people from around the globe. And though there has been pushback from entrenched interests at the Vatican, this pontiff is not easily conned: He gets information on all important church personnel and organizations from a variety of sources and shuns toadies and cronies.
    Operating budgets are now pruned to ensure that as much money as possible can go to charity. This, after all, is a pope who lives his own lessons.


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