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Commas Part Five

Here are some additional useful rules when working with the comma.

Use a comma after the salutation of a friendly letter.

Dear Marty,
Dearest Mom,

Use a comma after the closing in a friendly or business letter.

Sincerely,
Be well,

Use a comma to separate items in dates and addresses.

She was born on January 4, 1993, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
The family’s current address is 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue,
Washington, DC.

Note: A comma is not needed

• between the month and the day—April 18, 2010
• between the month and the year (when no day is offered)—
January 2020

• between the state (or state’s abbreviation) and the ZIP Code—
Canton, MA 02021

• between the house or apartment number and the street—
204 Joyner Court or Apartment 6A Twelfth Street
Use a comma to separate the speaker from the speaker’s
direct quotation.
Trey remarked, ‘‘This blanket was already washed.’’
‘‘My car needs new tires,’’ Gabriella said.
Note: Place the period and comma within the closing quotation marks.
Use a comma after a mild interjection.
Oh, I didn’t realize that you were here, Nana.
Note: Use an exclamation mark after a strong interjection.
Rats! I left my wallet at the beach.

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  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
  • Commas Part Five
  • Commas Part Four
  • Commas Part One
  • Commas Part Three
  • Commas Part Two
  • complete and simple predicates
  • complete and simple subjects
  • complex sentences
  • compound complex sentences
  • compound prepositions and the preposition adverb question
  • compound subject and compound predicate
  • compound subjects part two
  • compound subjects part one
  • Confusing usage words part eight
  • Confusing usage words part five
  • Confusing usage words part four
  • Confusing usage words part one
  • Confusing usage words part seven
  • Confusing usage words part six
  • Confusing usage words part three
  • Confusing usage words part three 2
  • Confusing usage words part two
  • First Capitalization List
  • indefinite pronouns
  • Indefinite pronouns and the possessive case
  • introducing clauses
  • introducing phrases
  • Irregular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • irregular verbs part one
  • irregular verbs part two
  • Italics Hyphens and Brackets
  • Misplaced and dangling modifiers
  • More Apostrophe Situations
  • More subject verb agreement situations
  • Parentheses Ellipsis Marks and Dashes
  • Periods Question Marks and Exclamation Marks
  • personal pronouns
  • pronouns and their antecedents
  • Quotation Marks Part Three
  • Quotation Marks Part One
  • Quotation Marks Part Two
  • reflexive demonstrative and interrogative pronouns
  • Regular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • regular verb tenses
  • Second Capitalization List
  • sentences fragments and run on sentences
  • singular and plural nouns and pronouns
  • Sound a like words Part Four
  • Sound a like words Part Three
  • Sound a like words Part Two
  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
  • the adjective
  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
  • the adverb
  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
  • The Apostrophe
  • the appositive
  • The Colon
  • The coordinating conjunction
  • the correlative conjunction
  • the direct object
  • the gerund and gerund phrase
  • the indirect object
  • the infinitive and infinitive phrase
  • The nominative case
  • the noun
  • the noun adjective pronoun question
  • the noun clause
  • the object of the preposition
  • the participle and participial phrase
  • The possessive case
  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
  • the preposition
  • the prepositional phrase
  • the pronoun
  • The Semicolon
  • the subordinating conjunction
  • the verb
  • The verb be
  • the verb phrase
  • Transitive and intransitive verbs
  • types of nouns
  • types of sentences by purpose
  • Using Capital Letters
  • what good writers do
  • Class 8 - Cell Structure and Functions
  • Healthy Elbow
  • Eye care tips for Computer users
  • Rules to play Darts
  • Healthy Forehead
  • Human Body Truths

  • SuperFood

    Dandelion

    Dandelion is rich in calcium, which is essential for the growth and strength of bones. It is rich in antioxidants like vitamin C and luteolin, which protect bones from age-related oxidant damage. Dandelion juice is a diuretic and may stimulate insulin production. Dandelion is also used as a vegetable; it’s a good source of fiber.
    Dandelion greens are rich in vitamin C and are among the best vegetable sources of beta-carotene. They provide potassium, iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and the B vitamins thiamine and riboflavin.
    Nutritional Facts :
    One-half cup of raw dandelion greens provides 45 calories, 9 g carbohydrate, 2.7 g protein, 0.49 g fat, 3.5 g dietary fiber, 4931 IU vitamin A, 35 mg vitamin C, 4.8 mg vitamin E, 273.7 mcg vitamin K, 27 mcg folic acid, 187 mg calcium, 2959 mcg beta-carotene, 0.17 mg copper, 3.1 mg iron, 36 mg magnesium, 66 mg phosphorus, 397 mg potassium, and 76 mg sodium.


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