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Quotation Marks Part Three

This is the third of three pages dealing with quotation marks. Study these
rules, and use them in your writing.

  • When you are writing dialogue, start a new paragraph each time the
    speaker changes.

    ‘‘We need to remodel the upstairs bathroom,’’ Mom said to Dad.
    He asked her, ‘‘How much do you think that this job will cost us? I
    think that I will probably be able to do most of the work.’’
    ‘‘Great!’’ Mom replied. ‘‘Let’s talk about the project again tomorrow.’’

  • Use only the opening quotation marks at the beginning of each
    paragraph when you are quoting a passage of more than one paragraph.
    The only time to include the closing quotation marks is at the end
    of the concluding paragraph.

    ‘‘The bridge was built after the immigrants began to come into the
    burgeoning city in large numbers. This bridge was not a luxury; it
    was a necessity. People demanded it, and the politicians responded
    quickly to their demands.

    ‘‘Then the good times for construction workers began—and
    continued—for the next three decades. There was always work�
    and plenty of it. To be able to use a saw and hammer meant that
    you were able to feed your family.’’

  • Use quotation marks to enclose the titles of the following: chapters,
    songs, articles, short poems, and short stories.

    ‘‘Before Hitting the Water’’ (chapter) from Kayaking for Fitness
    ‘‘America the Beautiful’’ (song)
    ‘‘More Strain, More Injuries’’ (article)
    ‘‘Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening’’ (short poem)
    ‘‘Beware of the Dog’’ (short story)

  • --- >>>
  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
  • Commas Part Five
  • Commas Part Four
  • Commas Part One
  • Commas Part Three
  • Commas Part Two
  • complete and simple predicates
  • complete and simple subjects
  • complex sentences
  • compound complex sentences
  • compound prepositions and the preposition adverb question
  • compound subject and compound predicate
  • compound subjects part two
  • compound subjects part one
  • Confusing usage words part eight
  • Confusing usage words part five
  • Confusing usage words part four
  • Confusing usage words part one
  • Confusing usage words part seven
  • Confusing usage words part six
  • Confusing usage words part three
  • Confusing usage words part three 2
  • Confusing usage words part two
  • First Capitalization List
  • indefinite pronouns
  • Indefinite pronouns and the possessive case
  • introducing clauses
  • introducing phrases
  • Irregular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • irregular verbs part one
  • irregular verbs part two
  • Italics Hyphens and Brackets
  • Misplaced and dangling modifiers
  • More Apostrophe Situations
  • More subject verb agreement situations
  • Parentheses Ellipsis Marks and Dashes
  • Periods Question Marks and Exclamation Marks
  • personal pronouns
  • pronouns and their antecedents
  • Quotation Marks Part Three
  • Quotation Marks Part One
  • Quotation Marks Part Two
  • reflexive demonstrative and interrogative pronouns
  • Regular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • regular verb tenses
  • Second Capitalization List
  • sentences fragments and run on sentences
  • singular and plural nouns and pronouns
  • Sound a like words Part Four
  • Sound a like words Part Three
  • Sound a like words Part Two
  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
  • the adjective
  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
  • the adverb
  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
  • The Apostrophe
  • the appositive
  • The Colon
  • The coordinating conjunction
  • the correlative conjunction
  • the direct object
  • the gerund and gerund phrase
  • the indirect object
  • the infinitive and infinitive phrase
  • The nominative case
  • the noun
  • the noun adjective pronoun question
  • the noun clause
  • the object of the preposition
  • the participle and participial phrase
  • The possessive case
  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
  • the preposition
  • the prepositional phrase
  • the pronoun
  • The Semicolon
  • the subordinating conjunction
  • the verb
  • The verb be
  • the verb phrase
  • Transitive and intransitive verbs
  • types of nouns
  • types of sentences by purpose
  • Using Capital Letters
  • what good writers do
  • New Mehandi Designs
  • Vocabulary Game 1
  • Goa
  • Funny Things To Do This Winter
  • Worst Movies Ever
  • Patiala

  • Celebration of Nag Panchami

    Mythological significance of the festival Nag Panchami

    This festival has rich mythological overtones, starting from the tremendous victory of Lord Krishna over the huge Kaliya in the Yamuna River. We have a further reference to Seshnag, the king of serpents, who was tamed by Lord Vishnu, as pictured in Ananda Padmanabha temple in Trivandrum of Kerala. The deity in the temple is Lord Vishnu, sleeping on the body of Seshnag. No wonder, the Keralites deem Nag Punchami as a huge festival and adore snakes on the day with piety. It is also considered as paying homage to Manasa, the serpent Goddess sister of Vasuki, the Snake who was used as a rope by the Devas and Asuras to churn the Milky Ocean. Nag Puja is carried out in Assam, Bengal, Jharkhand and Orissa in reverence of all snakes which have such a magnificent role in mythology. In Punjab, people celebrate Manasa Devi Ashtanag Puja (Guga Navami) by making a huge snake from flour and worshipping it.

    It is not only with Lord Vishnu, the greatness of snakes is associated it is also with Lord Shiva which is a very clear transparent concept, since it is the snake around the neck of Lord Shiva which inspires awe and piety on the very first look of the deity. Moreover in the Puranas, there is a reference to Brahma son wife as the mother of all nags.There is also a mythological story about a goddess Sathyeshwari, whose brother Sathyeshwar died before the day of Nag Panchami. She grieved over the death of her brother without eating anything. She saw her brother in the form of a cobra and believed that it was her brother. So, Nagdev promised her that he would protect any woman who deems a cobra as her brother and worships it. Hence, it became the habit of Hindu women to worship snakes for the longevity and safety of their brothers on this day.


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