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Ordering of Sentences
Directions:In the following items each passage consists of six sentences. The first and the sixth sentence are given in the beginning. The middle four sentences in each have been removed and jumbled up. These are labelled P, Q R and S. You are required to find out the proper sequence of the four sentences.


1. S1: When Weiner was travelling in India, he visited a factory where he saw small frail children sitting on damp ground.
S6: Recently he has published this book and it is winning him acclaim all over the world.

P: And the answer he got was that they were weaving carpets there.
Q: So he asked, "What are they doing there?"
R: And then he decided to study the problems of child labourers in India.
S: Weiner was shocked at the plight of the child workers.


2. S1: The mail is first collected from different letter boxes.
S6: Finally it is delivered to us.

P: From there it is sent to the head post office.
Q: It is then sorted out at the sorting office.
R: The mail is again sorted out at the head office by the concerned beat postman.
S: The sorted mail is sent to the zonal post office.


3. S1: Of the scholars who compose a university, some may be expected to devote an unbroken leisure to learning, their fellows having the advantage of their knowledge from their conversation, and the world perhaps from their writings.
S6: There classes of persons, then, go to compose a university as we know it - the scholar, the scholar who is also a teacher, and those who come to be taught, the undergraduate.

P: Others, however, will engage themselves to teach as well as to learn.
Q: Those who come to be taught at a university have to provide evidence that they are not merely beginners and not only do they have displayed before them the learning of their teachers, but they are offered a curriculum of study, to be followed by a test and the award of a degree.
R: But here again, it is the special manner of the pedagogic enterprise which distinguishes a university.
S: A place of learning without this could . scarcely be called a university.


4. S1: Growing up means not only getting larger, but also using our senses and our brains to become more aware of the things around us.
S6: In other words, we must develop and use our ability to reason, because the destruction or the preservation of the places in which we live depends on us.

P: Not only does he have a memory but he is able to think and reason.
Q: In this, man differs from all other animals.
R: Before we spray our roadside plants or turn sewage into our rivers, we should pause to think what the results of our actions are likely to be.
S: That is to say, he is able to plan what he is going to do in the light of his experience before he does it.


5. S1: In other words, grammar grows and changeg, and there is no such thing as correct use of English for the past, the present and the future.
S6: All the words that man has invented are divided into eight classes, which are called parts of speech.

P: "The door is broke."
Q: Yet this would have been correct in Shakespeare's time.
R: Today, only an uneducated person would say, "My arm is broke."
S: For example, in Shakespeare's play Hamlet, there is the line.



6. S1: Even the newsmen and spectators were not spared.
S6: He fell down, his bleeding eye bulging.

P: A homeguard in the gallery was hit on the face.
Q: They went only inches over the heads of newsmen in the press gallery.
R: Three bludgeons which are hurled missed their mark.
S: This made the scribes run helter - skelter.


7. S1: When a boy grows into a young man, he finds himself in a new and strange world.
S6: At this stage of his life he is like a body, without a soul, an eye without light or a Rower without fragrance.

P: The relationship remains but its nature changes.
Q: The emotional ties that he had with them are now loosened.
R: The old pattern of his life in which his parents were the nucleus around which his life revolved now undergoes a change.
S: He finds in himself an emotional void which he must somehow fill.


8. S1: You might say that all through history there have been wars and that mankind has survived inspite of them.
S6: Man has now discovered how to release the colossal forces locked up in the atom.

P: Now, if his purposes are those of destruction, each fresh advance in his mastery of nature only increases the danger from war, as, men learn to destroy one another in ever great numbers, from ever great distances, and in ever more varied and ingenious ways.
Q: He has learned to tap the hidden forces of our planet and use them for his purposes.
R: It has even developed and become civilised inspite of-them.
S: This is true, but unfortunately as part of his development man has enormously increased his power over nature.


9. S1: Yawning or its absence has been related to various clinical conditions.
S6: It is in reality a releasing stimulus.

P: Interestingly, some clinicians claim that those with acute physical illness don't yawn until they are on the road to recovery.
Q: It can be a symptom of brain lesions, haemorrhage, motion sickness and encephalitis.
R: But what is currently known about yawning is essentially anecdotal, mostly because the yawn has not got the respect it deserves.
S: On the other hand, it has been reported that psychotics rarely yawn, except those suffering from brain damage.


10. S1: Suddenly it began to climb swiftly, and I knew it was speeding eastward again till it became a speck in the blue morning.
S6: In that case there might be a chance on the moors to the right or left.

P: I didn't know what force they could command, but I was certain it would be sufficient.
Q: My enemies had located me, and the next thing would be a cordon round me.
R: That made me do some savage thinking.
S: The aeroplane had seen my bicycle, and would conclude that I would try to escape by the road.


English Test

1. Ordering of Sentences - Test-02
2. Ordering of Sentences - Test-03
3. Ordering of Sentences - Test-04
4. Ordering of Sentences - Test-05
5. Ordering of Sentences - Test-06
6. Sentence Completion - Test-01
7. Sentence Completion - Test-02
8. Sentence Completion - Test-03
9. Sentence Completion - Test-04
10. Sentence Completion - Test-05
11. Sentence Completion - Test-06
12. General Elementary English Test - 01
13. General Elementary English Test - 02
14. General Elementary English Test - 03
15. General Elementary English Test - 04
16. General Elementary English Test - 05
17. General Elementary English Test - 06
18. General Elementary English Test - 07
19. General Elementary English Test - 08
20. General Elementary English Test - 09
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