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Ordering of Sentences
Directions:In the following items each passage consists of six sentences. The first and the sixth sentence are given in the beginning. The middle four sentences in each have been removed and jumbled up. These are labelled P, Q R and S. You are required to find out the proper sequence of the four sentences.


1. S1: Governments are instituted among men to secure their certain inalienable rights.
S6: Such was the necessity which constrained the united colonies of America to give up thier allegiance to the British Crown and declare themselves free and independent states.

P: Accordingly, men are more disposed to suffer than to right themselves by abolishing the forms of governments to which they are accustomed.
Q: But prudence will dictate that governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes.
R: They derive their just powers from the consent of the governed, and therefore, can also be changed by them.
S: But whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these rights of the people, it is their duty to throw off such a government.


2. S1: I never took payment for speaking.
S6: In this way I secured perfect freedom of speech, and was warmed against the accusation of being a professional agitator.

P: The Sunday Society would then assure me that on these terms I might lecture on anything I liked and how I liked.
Q: It often happened that provincial' Sunday societies offered me the usual ten genuine fee to give the usual sort of leacture, avoiding controversial politics and religion.
R: Occasionally to avoid embarrassing other lecturers who lived by lecturing, the account was settled by a debit and credit entry, that is, I was credited with the usual fee and expenses and gave it back as a donation to the society.
S: I always replied that I never lectured on anything but very controversial politics and religion and that my fee was the price of my railway ticket third class if the place was farther off than I could afford to go at my own expense.


3. S1: It was early 1943 and the war in the East was going disastrously.
S6: Boarding Party, James Leasor's latest best - seller is a record of this tale of heroics tinged with irony and humour.

P: How this unlikely bunch of middle aged civilians accomplished their missions makes fascinating reading.
Q: To stop the sinkings a spy ring had to be broken, a German ship assaulted, and a secret radio transmitter silenced.
R: U-boats were torpedoing Allied ships in the Indian ocean faster ~han they could be replaced.
S: And the only people who could do the job were a handful of British businessmen in Calcutta-all men not called out for active service.


4. S1: The fifty seven storey Wool-worth Tbwer is in New York.
S6: A new champion is the Empire State Building which rises 102 storeys into the sky.

P: Soon it became one of the famous buildings in the world.
Q: It was completed in 1912.
R: Americans took pride in this tall skyscraper.
S: However, it was not long before five other buildings topped the Woolworth Tower.


5. S1: The right way to get people do things the way you want is not to compel them, drive them or for that matter even beg them or entreat them.
S6: The secret ofmotivation, therefore, lies in your ability to arouse the right kind of want or thirst in the other people.

P: The sure way to antagonise an individual is to give him the impression that you are out to force or compel him t;o do something.
Q: The correct way is, therefore, to arouse a want in them and make them do, whatever you want them to do willingly, happily and eagerly.
R: It is the most difficult thing in the world to make an individual do anything against his will.
S: Even young, innocent children resent being made to do things.



6. S1: No one knows when tea was first discovered, or how it came to be such a popular drink.
S6: It was called Cha's Ching, which, translated, means Tea Scripture.

P: By the eighth century A.D. most Chinese were drinking tea, both because they liked it as a beverage and for its medicinal value.
Q: Tea was so popular that one of the most distinguished poets of the T'ang dynasty, a man called Lu Yu, even wrote a holy scripture about it.
R: The beverage is generally accepted to have originated in China hundreds of years ago.
S: Records going back to the fourth century A.D. refer to tea.


7. S1: As a dramatist Rabindranath was not what might be called a success.
S6: Therefore, drama forms the essential part of the traditional Indian culture.

P: His dramas were moulded more on the lines of the traditional Indian village dramas than the dramas of the modern world.
Q: His plays were more a catalogue of ideas than a vehicle of the expression of action.
R: Actually drama has always been the life of the Indian people, as it deals with legends of gods and goddesses.
S: Although in his short stories and novels he was able to create living and well - defined characters, he did not seem to be able to do so in his dramas.


8. S1: Silence is unnatural to man.
S6: He knows. that ninety nine percent of human conversation means no more than the buzzing of a fly, but he longs to join in the buzz and to prove that he is a man and not a wax-work figure.

P: Even his conversation is in great measure a desperate attempt to prevent a dreadful silence.
Q: In the interval he does all he can to make a noise in the world.
R: There are few things of which he stands in more fear than of the absence of noise.
S: He begins life with a cry and ends it in stillness.


9. S1: But how does a new word get into the dictionary?
S6: He sorts them according to their grammatical function, and carefully 'writes a definition.

P: When a new dictionary is being edited, a lexicographer collects all the alphabetically arTange(,' citation slips for a particular word.
Q: The dictionary makers notice it and. make a note of it on a citation slip. i
R: The moment a new word is coined, it usually enters the spoken language.
S: The word then passes from the realm of hearing to the realm of writing.


10. S1: A small pool in the rocks outside my cottage in the Mussoorie hills provides me endless delight.
S6: It did and then, looking up, saw me and leapt across the ravine to disappear into the forest.

P: I stood very still, anxious that it should drink its fill.
Q: And once I saw a barking deer, head lowered at the edge of the pool.
R: Water beetles paddle the surface, while tiny fish lurk in the shallows.
S: Sometimes a spotted fork - tail bird comes to drink, hopping delicately from rock to rock.


English Test

1. Ordering of Sentences - Test-05
2. Ordering of Sentences - Test-06
3. Sentence Completion - Test-01
4. Sentence Completion - Test-02
5. Sentence Completion - Test-03
6. Sentence Completion - Test-04
7. Sentence Completion - Test-05
8. Sentence Completion - Test-06
9. General Elementary English Test - 01
10. General Elementary English Test - 02
11. General Elementary English Test - 03
12. General Elementary English Test - 04
13. General Elementary English Test - 05
14. General Elementary English Test - 06
15. General Elementary English Test - 07
16. General Elementary English Test - 08
17. General Elementary English Test - 09
18. General Elementary English Test - 10
19. General Elementary English Test - 11
20. General Elementary English Test - 12
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