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Ordering of Sentences
Directions:In the following items each passage consists of six sentences. The first and the sixth sentence are given in the beginning. The middle four sentences in each have been removed and jumbled up. These are labelled P, Q R and S. You are required to find out the proper sequence of the four sentences.


1. S1: Work with retarded children, in particular, involves superhuman patience and long-delayed rewards.
S6: After five years, the girl finally began to smile, when her foster grandparents entered the room.

P: Another woman faithfully spent two hours a day, five days a week, with a bed-ridden retarded girl.
Q: It was three years before the, girl made her first cut in a piece of paper.
R: The girl had never before responded to, or recognised anyone.
S: One woman decided to teach a young brain - damaged girl how to use scissors.


2. S1: As I say, I was born and brought up in an Atmosphere of the confluence of three movements, all of which were revolutionary.
S6: He should not only have his own seeds but prepare his own soil.

P: I was born in a family which had to live its own life, which led me from my young days to seek guidance for my own self expression in my own inner standard of judgement.
Q: No poet should borrow his medium ready-made from some shop of respectability.
R: But the language which belonged to the people had to be modulated according to the urging which I as an individual had.
S: The medium of expression, doubtless, was my mother tongue.


3. S1: No one knows when tea was first discovered, or how it came to be such a popular drink.
S6: It was called Cha's Ching, which, translated, means Tea Scripture.

P: By the eighth century A.D. most Chinese were drinking tea, both because they liked it as a beverage and for its medicinal value.
Q: Tea was so popular that one of the most distinguished poets of the T'ang dynasty, a man called Lu Yu, even wrote a holy scripture about it.
R: The beverage is generally accepted to have originated in China hundreds of years ago.
S: Records going back to the fourth century A.D. refer to tea.


4. S1: We are living in an age in which technology has suddenly 'annihilated distance'.
S6: In that event, we should be dooming ourselves to wipe each other out.

P: Are We going to let this consciousness of our variety make us fear and hate each other?
Q: Physically we are now all neighbours, but psychologically we are still strangers to each other.
R: How are we going to react?
S: We have never been so conscious of our variety as we are now that we have come to such close quarters.


5. S1: Silence is unnatural to man.
S6: He knows. that ninety nine percent of human conversation means no more than the buzzing of a fly, but he longs to join in the buzz and to prove that he is a man and not a wax-work figure.

P: Even his conversation is in great measure a desperate attempt to prevent a dreadful silence.
Q: In the interval he does all he can to make a noise in the world.
R: There are few things of which he stands in more fear than of the absence of noise.
S: He begins life with a cry and ends it in stillness.



6. S1: Proverbs contain homely but universal truths.
S6: They are everyman's philosophy.

P: They point out the incongruities of situations in life.
Q: Naturally, therefore, they are translatable from one language to another.
R: Therefore, their appeal is direct.
S: Many of them had their birth in folk literature.


7. S1: There was a time Egypt faced economic crisis.
S6: Egypt was able to sustain itself by its cotton produce.

P: Cotton is the chief export commodity 9f Egypt.
Q: Foreign trade depends on cultivation of cotton on large scale.
R: It became necessary for Egypt to boost cotton crops.
S: Only by means of increasing foreign trade Egypt could survive.


8. S1: The fifty seven storey Wool-worth Tbwer is in New York.
S6: A new champion is the Empire State Building which rises 102 storeys into the sky.

P: Soon it became one of the famous buildings in the world.
Q: It was completed in 1912.
R: Americans took pride in this tall skyscraper.
S: However, it was not long before five other buildings topped the Woolworth Tower.


9. S1: I never took payment for speaking.
S6: In this way I secured perfect freedom of speech, and was warmed against the accusation of being a professional agitator.

P: The Sunday Society would then assure me that on these terms I might lecture on anything I liked and how I liked.
Q: It often happened that provincial' Sunday societies offered me the usual ten genuine fee to give the usual sort of leacture, avoiding controversial politics and religion.
R: Occasionally to avoid embarrassing other lecturers who lived by lecturing, the account was settled by a debit and credit entry, that is, I was credited with the usual fee and expenses and gave it back as a donation to the society.
S: I always replied that I never lectured on anything but very controversial politics and religion and that my fee was the price of my railway ticket third class if the place was farther off than I could afford to go at my own expense.


10. S1: Several sub-cities have been planned around the capital.
S6: Hopefully the housing problem will not be as acute as at present after these sub-cities are built.

P: Dwarka is the first among them.
Q: They are expected to alleviate the problem of housing.
R: It is coming up in the south-west of the capital.
S: It will cater to one million people when completed.


English Test

1. Ordering of Sentences - Test-05
2. Ordering of Sentences - Test-06
3. Sentence Completion - Test-01
4. Sentence Completion - Test-02
5. Sentence Completion - Test-03
6. Sentence Completion - Test-04
7. Sentence Completion - Test-05
8. Sentence Completion - Test-06
9. General Elementary English Test - 01
10. General Elementary English Test - 02
11. General Elementary English Test - 03
12. General Elementary English Test - 04
13. General Elementary English Test - 05
14. General Elementary English Test - 06
15. General Elementary English Test - 07
16. General Elementary English Test - 08
17. General Elementary English Test - 09
18. General Elementary English Test - 10
19. General Elementary English Test - 11
20. General Elementary English Test - 12
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