Ordering of Sentences Test 15

Ordering of Sentences
Directions:In the following items each passage consists of six sentences. The first and the sixth sentence are given in the beginning. The middle four sentences in each have been removed and jumbled up. These are labelled P, Q R and S. You are required to find out the proper sequence of the four sentences.

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1. S1: The mail is first collected from different letter boxes.
S6: Finally it is delivered to us.

P: From there it is sent to the head post office.
Q: It is then sorted out at the sorting office.
R: The mail is again sorted out at the head office by the concerned beat postman.
S: The sorted mail is sent to the zonal post office.

 
 
 
 

2. S1: Of the scholars who compose a university, some may be expected to devote an unbroken leisure to learning, their fellows having the advantage of their knowledge from their conversation, and the world perhaps from their writings.
S6: There classes of persons, then, go to compose a university as we know it – the scholar, the scholar who is also a teacher, and those who come to be taught, the undergraduate.

P: Others, however, will engage themselves to teach as well as to learn.
Q: Those who come to be taught at a university have to provide evidence that they are not merely beginners and not only do they have displayed before them the learning of their teachers, but they are offered a curriculum of study, to be followed by a test and the award of a degree.
R: But here again, it is the special manner of the pedagogic enterprise which distinguishes a university.
S: A place of learning without this could . scarcely be called a university.

 
 
 
 

3. S1: American private lives may seem shallow.
S6: This would not happen in China, he said.

P: Students would walk away with books they had not paid for.
Q: A Chinese journalist commented on a curious institution: the library.
R: Their public morality, however, impressed visitors.
S: But in general they returned them.

 
 
 
 

4. S1: The commonest form of forgetfulness, I suppose, occurs in the matter of posting letters.
S6: Weary of holding it in my hand, I then put it for safety into one of my pockets and forget all about it.

P: So common is it that I am always reluctant to trust a departing visitor to post an important letter.
Q: As for myself, anyone who asks me to post a letter is a poor judge of character.
R: Even if I carry the letter in my hand I am always past the first pillar box before I remember that I ought to have posted it.
S: So little I rely on his mem?,ry that I put him on his oath before handing the letter to him.

 
 
 
 

5. S1: A transformation of consciousness is now beginning to express itself in the field of theoretical architecture.
S6: The relationship between culture and nature is changed, for the architect grows a house like a garden.

P: In the still theoretical structure an attempt is being made to create a house that is “a domestication of an ecosystem.”
Q: What is happening in the architecture is a shift from the international style of the post industrial era to a symbolic structure.
R: Since architecture is the collective unconscious made visible, the architect does not himself always understand the full cultural implications of his own work.
S: The new form is not a celebration of power over new materials, but a celebration of cooperation with ecosystem.

 
 
 
 

6. S1: In other words, grammar grows and changeg, and there is no such thing as correct use of English for the past, the present and the future.
S6: All the words that man has invented are divided into eight classes, which are called parts of speech.

P: “The door is broke.”
Q: Yet this would have been correct in Shakespeare’s time.
R: Today, only an uneducated person would say, “My arm is broke.”
S: For example, in Shakespeare’s play Hamlet, there is the line.

 
 
 
 

7. S1: You might say that all through history there have been wars and that mankind has survived inspite of them.
S6: Man has now discovered how to release the colossal forces locked up in the atom.

P: Now, if his purposes are those of destruction, each fresh advance in his mastery of nature only increases the danger from war, as, men learn to destroy one another in ever great numbers, from ever great distances, and in ever more varied and ingenious ways.
Q: He has learned to tap the hidden forces of our planet and use them for his purposes.
R: It has even developed and become civilised inspite of-them.
S: This is true, but unfortunately as part of his development man has enormously increased his power over nature.

 
 
 
 

8. S1: There are examinations at school which a pupil can pass by cramming the texts.
S6: Thus, reading, reflection and experience are the three stages in, gaining spiritual knowledge.

P: But for spiritual knowledge mere memory of holy texts will be of no use in passing the texts.
Q: One can score in them by the power of memory.
R: A competent guru alone can provide the necessary guidance to an earnest disciple.
S: What the text says has to be reflected upon and experienced by the speaker.

 
 
 
 

9. S1: When a boy grows into a young man, he finds himself in a new and strange world.
S6: At this stage of his life he is like a body, without a soul, an eye without light or a Rower without fragrance.

P: The relationship remains but its nature changes.
Q: The emotional ties that he had with them are now loosened.
R: The old pattern of his life in which his parents were the nucleus around which his life revolved now undergoes a change.
S: He finds in himself an emotional void which he must somehow fill.

 
 
 
 

10. S1: Welcome to Madam Tussaud’s.
S6: These life-like, casually posed figures are mere wax statues, though they may look alive.

P: Famous faces, notorious faces haunt these halls; royalty, and world leaders mingling with sports stars and murderers.
Q: But don’t expect a~ y responses to your smilesor greetings.
R: Don’t be surprised at anything you see here.
S: See how many you can recognise.

 
 
 
 

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