• English Test Series

Homonyms

  • Total Quiz

    70

  • DURATION

    10 Min/Quiz

  • FEE

    From: 99

About Course

Homonyms are words that are pronounced the same as each other (e.g., "maid" and "made") or have the same spelling (e.g., "lead weight" and "to lead"). When homonyms have the same sound, they are called "homophones." When they have the same spelling, they are called "homographs." (Homographs with different sounds (e.g., "tear drop" and "to tear a hole") are called "heteronyms.") Therefore, it is possible for a homonym to be a homophone (same sound) and a homograph (same spelling), e.g., "vampire bat" and "cricket bat". In linguistics, homonyms, broadly defined, are words which are homographs (words that share the same spelling, regardless of pronunciation) or homophones (words that share the same pronunciation, regardless of spelling), or both.[1] For example, according to this definition, the words row (propel with oars), row (argument) and row (a linear arrangement) are homonyms, as are the words see (vision) and sea (body of water). A more restrictive or technical definition sees homonyms as words that are simultaneously homographs and homophones[1] – that is to say they have identical spelling and pronunciation, whilst maintaining different meanings. Examples are the pair stalk (part of a plant) and stalk (follow/harass a person) and the pair left (past tense of leave) and left (opposite of right). A distinction is sometimes made between true homonyms, which are unrelated in origin, such as skate (glide on ice) and skate (the fish), and polysemous homonyms, or polysemes, which have a shared origin, such as mouth (of a river) and mouth (of an animal).[2][3] The relationship between a set of homonyms is called homonymy, and the associated adjective is homonymous or homonymic. The adjective "homonymous" can additionally be used wherever two items share the same name,[4][5] independent of how closely they are or are not related in terms of their meaning or etymology. For example, the name Ōkami is homonymous with the Japanese term for "wolf" (Ōkami).

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